Celebrating New Year’s Day with My 21 Most Anticipated Titles of 2021

It probably doesn’t surprise you to learn that I’m one of those people who love the New Year. I really enjoy the opportunity this holiday gives us to look back at our accomplishments and challenges from last year, while we also look forward and make plans for the year we are moving into.

Like many of you, I’ve been doing a lot of looking forward this year. 2020 has been particularly challenging for so many of us, and I know we are ready to put it behind us, so today I want to look forward. I want to share the 21 titles I am most excited about in 2021!

The best part is you can already preorder these titles, so you don’t have to remember to buy them when they come out later this year. I’m not the only one who preorders books to be “surprised” when the release date sneaks up on me later, am I?

Please note: This list will contain affiliate links. I will receive a small commission from purchases made using these links at no additional cost to you. This commission allows me to maintain this site and continue bringing content to you.

So without further ado, here are my most anticipated titles of 2021, in no particular order!

Rainbow Boy by Taylor Rouanzion, Illustrated by Stacey Chomiak – January 26, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“A story about a boy with a heart too big for one color alone.”

“A little boy attempts to answer one of grown-ups’ all-time favorite questions: “What’s your favorite color?” But with so many wonderful colors to choose from, he doesn’t know how to answer. He loves his pink sparkly tutu, bright red roses, soft yellow baby doll pajamas, and big, orange basketball. How will he ever pick?”

Anita and The Dragons by Hannah Carmona, Illustrated by Anna Cunha – April 6, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Anita watches the dragons high above her as she hops from one cement roof to another in her village in the Dominican Republic. But being the valiant princesa she is, she never lets them scare her. Will she be brave enough to enter the belly of the beast and take flight to new adventures?”

The Old Boat by Jarrett Pumphrey and Jerome Pumphrey – March 2, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Off a small island, a boy and his grandmother set sail in their beloved fishing boat. They ride the waves, dreaming, catching fish, and seeing the wonders of the ocean. But soon the boy is sailing the boat himself, venturing further from shore as the waters grow dirty and polluted. When a storm washes him ashore and wrecks the old boat, he sees home in a new light. He decides to turn the tides of his fortune, cleaning the island’s waters and creating a new life with a family to call his own. With an eye-catching design and masterfully detailed illustrations, The Old Boat is an exquisite story about caring for the places we call home.”

Fatima’s Great Outdoors by Ambreen Tariq, Illustrated by Stevie Lewis March 30, 2021 – (Bookshop | Amazon)

“An immigrant family embarks on their first camping trip in the Midwest in this lively picture book by Ambreen Tariq, outdoors activist and founder of @BrownPeopleCamping.

Ambreen Tariq’s picture book debut, with cheerful illustrations by Stevie Lewis, is a rollicking family adventure, a love letter to the outdoors, and a reminder that public land belongs to all of us.”

Kindness Is A Kite String by Michelle Schaub, Illustrated by Claire LaForte – April 1, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Watch empathy ripple through the community… spreading happiness like sunshine, connecting diverse groups like a footbridge, and lifting hope like a kite string. How can YOU lift others with kindness?”

We Are Still Here by Traci Sorell, Illustrated by Frane Lessac – April 20, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Twelve Native American kids present historical and contemporary laws, policies, struggles, and victories in Native life, each with a powerful refrain: We are still here!

Too often, Native American history is treated as a finished chapter instead of relevant and ongoing. This companion book to the award-winning We Are Grateful: Otsaliheliga offers readers everything they never learned in school about Native American people’s past, present, and future.”

My Two Border Towns by David Bowles, Illustrated by Erika Meza – August 24, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“A picture book debut by an award-winning author about a boy’s life on the U.S.-Mexico border, visiting his favorite places on The Other Side with his father, spending time with family and friends, and sharing in the responsibility of community care.

My Two Border Towns by David Bowles, with illustrations by Erika Meza, is the loving story of a father and son’s weekend ritual, a demonstration of community care, and a tribute to the fluidity, complexity, and vibrancy of life on the U.S.-Mexico border.”

Hear My Voice/Escucha mi voz: The Testimonies of Children Detained at the Southern Border of the United States – April 13, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“A moving picture book for older children and families that introduces a difficult topic, amplifying the voices and experiences of immigrant children detained at the border between Mexico and the US. The children’s actual words (from publicly available court documents) are assembled to tell one heartbreaking story, in both English and Spanish (back to back). Each spread is illustrated in striking full-color by a different Latinx artist. A portion of sales will be donated to human rights organizations that work with children on the border.”

The Tea Dragon Tapestry by K. O’Neill – June 1, 2021 (Amazon)

“Join Greta and Minette once more for the heartwarming conclusion of the award-winning Tea Dragon series!

Told with the same care and charm as the previous installments of the Tea Dragon series, The Tea Dragon Tapestry welcomes old friends and new into a heartfelt story of purpose, love, and growth.”

In My Mosque by M. O. Yuksel, Illustrated by Hatem Aly – March 23, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“No matter who you are or where you’re from, everyone is welcome here. From grandmothers reading lines of the Qur’an and the imam telling stories of living as one, to meeting new friends and learning to help others, mosques are centers for friendship, community, and love.”

Send a Girl!: The True Story of How Women Joined the FDNY by Jessica M. Rinker, Illustrated by Meg Hunt – March 9, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Brenda Berkman was often told that she couldn’t do certain things because she was a girl. When she grew up, she longed for a job that was challenging, different every day, and required physical and mental strength. In 1977 when the New York City Fire Department finally complied with the Civil Rights Act (from 1964) by allowing women to take the FDNY exam, Brenda jumped at the chance.

But the FDNY changed the rules of the exam so women wouldn’t be able to pass it. Even a lot of men couldn’t pass this new exam.

So Brenda Berkman took the FDNY to court. “

When Lola Visits by Michelle Sterling, Illustrated by Aaron Asis – May 18, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“In an evocative picture book brimming with the scents, tastes, and traditions that define summer for one young girl, debut author Michelle Sterling and illustrator Aaron Asis come together to celebrate the gentle bonds of familial love that span oceans and generations.”

Bodies Are Cool by Tyler Feder – June 1, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“From the way a body jiggles to the scars a body bears, this picture book is a pure celebration of all the different human bodies that exist in the world. Highlighting the various skin tones, body shapes, and hair types is just the beginning in this truly inclusive book. With its cheerful illustrations and exuberant refrain, this book will instill body positivity and confidence in the youngest of readers.”

Bindu’s Bindis by Supriya Kelkar, Illustrated by Parvati Pillai – March 2, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“This charming picture book is about a little girl who loves her bindis (and the many creative shapes they come in!). The bindis are also a connection to her Nani who lives in India. When Nani comes to visit Bindu and brings the bindis to her, it is just in time to wear something new to the school talent show. Bindu and Nani work together to shine their brightest and embrace their sparkle, even when they stand out from the crowd.”

Our Skin: A First Conversation About Race by Megan Madison and Jessica Ralli, Illustrated by Isabel Roxas – March 16, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Based on the research that race, gender, consent, and body positivity should be discussed with toddlers on up, this read-aloud board book series offers adults the opportunity to begin important conversations with young children in an informed, safe, and supported way.

Developed by experts in the fields of early childhood and activism against injustice, this topic-driven board book offers clear, concrete language and beautiful imagery that young children can grasp and adults can leverage for further discussion.”

All of Us by Kathryn Erskine, Illustrated by Alexandra Boiger – May 18, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

ME can be WE. YOU can come, too. In a lyrical text that travels the globe, National Book Award winner Kathryn Erskine shows young readers how the whole world is a community made up of people who are more similar than we are different. With stunning, cinematic art by Alexandra Boiger, the illustrator of the She Persisted series, this is the perfect read-aloud at bedtime or for story time. Perfect for fans of All Are Welcome and Be Kind.”

Families Grow by Dan Saks, Illustrated by Brooke Smart – August 3, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“This warm appreciation of love invites the youngest readers to share in the joy and excitement of expecting families. The lyrical, rhyming text subtly references pregnancy, surrogacy, and adoption, gently touching on the different ways a family can grow. The book’s celebratory yet comforting tone incites both appreciation and understanding, leaving readers with a lasting message of unconditional familial love. Includes a simple glossary at the end.”

I Am The Subway by Kim Hyo-eun, Translated by Deborah Smith – August 3, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“A cinematic journey through the Seoul subway that masterfully portrays the many unique lives we travel alongside whenever we take the train. A poetic translation of the bestselling Korean picture book.

Originally published in Korean and brought to English-speaking audiences with the help of renowned translator Deborah Smith (The Vegetarian), I Am the Subway vividly reflects the shared humanity that can be found in crowded metropolitan cities.”

We All Play by Julie Flett – May 25, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“This wonderful book celebrates diversity and the interconnectedness of nature through an Indigenous perspective, complete with a glossary of Cree words for wild animals at the back of the book, and children repeating a Cree phrase throughout the book. Readers will encounter birds who chase and chirp, bears who wiggle and wobble, whales who swim and squirt, owls who peek and peep, and a diverse group of kids who love to do the same, shouting:

We play too! / kimêtawânaw mîna

A beautiful ode to the animals and humans we share our world with, We All Play belongs on every bookshelf.”

Kiyoshi’s Walk by Mark Karlins, Illustrated by Nicole Wong – March 9, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Where do poems come from? This beautiful picture book about a young aspiring poet and his grandfather shows that the answer lies all around us–if we take the time to look.”

Prince & Knight: Tale of the Shadow King by Daniel Haack, Illustrated by Stevie Lewis – April 27, 2021 (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Our brave and dashing heroes, the prince and the knight, are happily married and their kingdom is prospering, but soon, a fog of darkness that blocks the sun spreads across their land. They get word that the cause of this is a dark and mysterious Shadow King, and they rush off to find and stop him, but encounter many obstacles along the way. Will they be able to restore the light to their kingdom?”

I hope you all enjoyed this list and found a book (or a few, if you lack self control like me) to add to your little one’s shelves in the next year.

What books do you have your eye on in 2021? Make sure to share in the comments below!

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Four Picture Books To Celebrate World Arabic Language Day

Tomorrow, December 18th, is World Arabic Language Day. Established in 2010 by the United Nations, this holiday is intended to celebrate multilingualism and cultural diversity.

Living in a world where people are ridiculed for their differences, and more specifically a country where languages other than English are often dismissed, I feel it is incredibly important to embrace and celebrate languages other than English. This is especially true for those who, like me, only speak one language.

Though I am not bilingual, I have always been thrilled to pick up words from other languages throughout my life. From my “adopted” babushka and dedushka who tried to teach me Russian in my 20’s, to members of my childhood church who gave me Vietnamese lessons, I have always been amazed at the joy of being able to speak to someone in their native tongue. Even if it’s a simple “xin chào” or “spasiba”, I could let the people I loved know they were seen and appreciated by using these words.

I want to encourage my son to have this same respect for all languages, even if he is only ever fluent in English. Because of this, I am always on the lookout for picture books that introduce young readers to new languages. Some of my favorites highlight the Arabic language, and I thought they would be the perfect books to share today!

Please note: This article contains affiliate links, from which I will receive a small commission. This commission allows me to maintain this website and continue to bring new content to you.

Deep In The Sahara by Kelly Cunnane, Illustrated by Hoda Hadadi

In Deep In The Sahara we meet a young Arabic girl named Lalla who wants to wear a malafa (the colorful cloth worn by Muslim women in Mauritania) just like all the other women in her family. She talks to the women around her about how their malafa makes them beautiful, mysterious, traditional, or royal, but eventually learns the true reason they wear the malafa. This is a beautiful story of a young girl embracing the faith and traditions of her family. This book has a few Hassaniya (an Arabic dialect) words peppered throughout, which are a great way to teach young readers a new word or two!

Like The Moon Loves The Sky by Hena Khan, Illustrated by Saffa Khan

This beautifully illustrated book is a tender celebration of the unconditional love parents have for their children. Like The Moon Loves The Sky is inspired by the Quran, making it a great book for teaching religious acceptance while celebrating Arabic. The only Arabic word found in the book is “Inshallah” (translated to “if Allah wills” or “God willing”), but it is a beautiful introduction to the Arabic language none-the-less. This heartwarming book makes the perfect bedtime read, and a great gift for new parents.

The Arabic Quilt by Aya Khalil, Illustrated by Anait Semirdzhyan

In The Arabic Quilt we meet Kanzi, who’s family has immigrated from Egypt. When Kanzi’s mom shows up at school one day to bring her kofta sandwich, Kanzi’s classmates don’t understand why her mother calls her habibti, and begin to tease Kanzi. That night she wraps up in her quilt from her teita (grandma) in Cairo and writes a poem. Her teacher finds the poem and allows Kanzi to bring the quilt in, inspiring the classroom to make an Arabic quilt of their own. This is a great story to encourage young readers to be curious about languages they don’t speak, and respectful of those who speak those languages.

Silent Music: A Story of Baghdad by James Rumford

Silent Music is the story of a young boy named Ali who lives in Baghdad. Ali loves calligraphy and looks up to Yaqut al-Musta’simi, a famous calligrapher who is also from Baghdad. With illustrations depicting Ali’s beautiful Arabic calligraphy strung together like musical notes, this book is a stunning celebration of the written Arabic language.

I hope you enjoyed this list! If you would like to learn more about World Arabic Language Day, be sure to visit the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization’s website for more information!

What are your some of you favorite children’s books highlighting Arabic or other languages foreign to you? Be sure to share them in the comments below!

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Eight Children’s Books For The Eight Nights of Hanukkah

As families across the world prepare to begin their Hanukkah celebrations tonight, I have to be honest with you all: I didn’t know actually the meaning behind Hanukkah until recently. I realized this when someone I know told me they thought Hanukkah had something to do with Hitler, and though I was 99.9% sure they were wrong, I hadn’t educated myself enough to explain their error. Obviously, I realized I had a problem, and so I began to educate myself. As I learned of the history of the Maccabean Revolt and the traditions surrounding this holiday, I realized how important it is to expose our children to holidays that we don’t celebrate.

Though I am not Jewish, I believe it’s important to give our children an understanding of holidays and celebrations that other children in their lives may be taking part in. They will be better equipped to understand and accept classmates, cousins, and playdate partners with different religious upbringings when they have been exposed to these holidays and celebrations in their own homes. They will also be better equipped to correct misinformation than I was in my situation.

These eight books all offer great explanations behind Hanukkah traditions and history, giving young readers an understanding of what the holidays might look like in other homes. Any one of them would be great for any family celebrating Hanukkah, or for families who want to introduce their children to The Festival of Lights.

Antlers With Candles by Chris Barash, Illustrated by Melissa Iwai

In Antlers With Candles we follow a little boy on his first Hanukkah. He doesn’t quite understand all the curious objects he discovers around his home. His dad discovers the mess he has made and cleans up while explaining what the menorah, latkes, and dreidels are all for. This is the perfect introduction to Hanukkah for babies and toddlers!

Queen of The Hanukkah Dosas by Pamela Ehrenberg, Illustrated by Anjan Sarkar

Told from the perspective of the older brother in a multi-cultural family, Queen of The Hanukkah Dosas is a charming tale of one family’s Hanukkah celebration. Because their mom is Indian and their father is Jewish, this family eats dosas (rice pancakes) every year instead of latkes. The little sister Sadie won’t stop climbing up on everything as the family prepares to celebrate, but her antics might just save the day when the family finds themselves in an unexpected situation. I also love that this book has a recipe for both latkes and dosas in the back. Who doesn’t love learning about different cultures through foods?

How Do Dinosaurs Say Happy Chanukah by Jane Yolen, Illustrated by Mark Teague

Bookshop | Amazon

How Do Dinosaurs Say Happy Chanukah is a fantastic book for children who are curious about the holiday. Following the format of this familiar series, we see all the wrong ways to say “Happy Chanukah” (followed by the right ways, of course) demonstrated by all kinds of dinosaurs. I love this series for discussing acceptable behavior with little ones, because we have examples of dinosaurs behaving badly. Those dinosaurs always come around and behave themselves in the end though. A great introduction to the activities and traditions of Chanukah for any little one, but especially those that love Dinosaurs.

Little Red Ruthie: A Hanukkah Tale by Gloria Koster, Illustrated by Sue Eastland

Little Red Ruthie is an adorable retelling of Little Red Riding Hood with a Hanukkah twist. Little Red Ruthie is headed to Bubbe Basha’s house to make latkes, but she gets lost in the snowfall on her way. A wolf finds Ruthie and wants to eat her for dinner. Ruthie thinks fast and explains that it’s the first day of Hanukkah, and she will make a much better meal if the wolf just waits eight days. The wolf agrees, but changes his mind and decides to eat both Ruthie and her grandma. Ruthie outsmarts him again while teaching him a bit about Hanukkah along the way. There is a recipe for Ruthie’s Potato Latkes included at the end!

Hanukkah Hamster by Michelle Markel, Illustrated by Andre Ceolin

Hanukkah Hamster is a heartwarming picture book about Edgar, a cab driver who has recently moved away from his home in Israel, leaving his family behind. Edgar finds a hamster in his cab and can’t seem to find its owner. He takes the hamster home and feeds it, eventually naming him Chickpea. Edgar and Chickpea celebrate several night of Hanukkah together until Edgar recognizes the customer who lost Chickpea. I won’t spoil it, but I will just say this one has a happy ending. I love that this book reminds us that we can find companionship in the most unexpected places.

Jeremy’s Dreidel by Ellie Gellman, Illustrated by Maria Mola

In Jeremy’s Dreidel, we meet Jeremy and his friends who are building dreidels at their local JCC (Jewish Community Center). Jeremy wants to build a Braille dreidel for his father, who is blind. Jeremy educates the children about his fathers disability and provides great examples of what a blind person’s everyday life looks like. A Hanukkah lesson is also woven into the children’s narrative. There are also instructions to build some of the dreidels mentioned in the story included in the back of the book. This is a sweet book with great disabled and Jewish representation.

Hanukkah in Alaska by Barbara Brown, Illustrated by Stacey Schuett

Hannukah in Alaska is a funny Hanukkah story about how different things can look in Alaska sometimes. Our main character is not feeling excited about celebrating Hanukkah this year. It might just be because there is a moose in her backyard, and she’s worried he will break her swing. One night, things turn around when her mom and dad wake her up in the middle of the night for a beautiful surprise. She is so inspired that she comes up with a clever solution to their big moose problem. This is a perfect winter read, but especially fitting for Hanukkah of course.

The Eight Knights of Hanukkah by Leslie Kimmelman Illustrated by Galia Bernstein

We all know about the eight nights of Hanukkah, but have you heard about the Eight Knights of Hanukkah? In this adorable picture book a dragon named Dreadful is ruining the Hanukkah festivities! Lady Sadie ask the Eight Knights of Hanukkah to stop the dragon with “deeds of awesome kindness and stupendous bravery”. There is also instructions on how to play the dreidel game in the back.

I hope these titles help you and your family learn a little more about Hanukkah celebrations, and have a little fun along the way!

Has your family read any of these titles? What books do you read to celebrate or educate your family about Hanukkah? Don’t forget to comment below and share!

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Five Books to Celebrate National Adoption Month

Did you know that November is National Adoption Month here in the US? I thought it would only be right to celebrate with a few books about adoption. (Please note: this post will contain affiliate links, from which I receive a small commission. This commission allows me to maintain this website, and continue to put out regular content.)

While I am personally not a part of the adoption community (i.e. I am not adopted, nor is my son), I believe it is important that we teach all children about diverse family structures, including foster and adoptive families. Giving our children this knowledge not only allows them to understand that their family structure is not the only one, but it can also prepare them to respond appropriately when they meet someone with a different family structure than theirs. I can’t think of a better way to share knowledge than reading, so I would like to recommend these books to start conversations about adoption.

Pablo’s Tree

Pablo’s Tree by Pat Mora, Illustrated by Cecily Lang

This is a precious story about a boy named Pablo, and his tradition of visiting his grandfather every year on the day after his birthday. Throughout the story we learn that Pablo was adopted, and his grandfather has been celebrating his adoption day in a unique way every year since he was born. This book doesn’t explain adoption in an in-depth way, and there is not conflict. It’s just a sweet story of a cute little family and their love for each other.

A Crazy Much Love

A Crazy-Much Love by Joy Jordan-Lake, Illustrated by Sonia Sanchez

This little book has so much love in it. Told from the adoptive parent’s perspective, this story recounts a family’s experience adopting their daughter from China. A Crazy-Much Love follows this family from the anticipation of “the” phone call, all the way up to their daughters first day of school, This is a “warm hug” kind of book. Though there isn’t a lot of explanation about the adoption process, this is the perfect book to show children unfamiliar with adoption how parents love their adopted children the same way their parents love them.

The Story I’ll Tell

The Story I’ll Tell by Nancy Tupper Ling, Illustrated by Jessica Lanan

In this book, a mother wonders what she will tell her son when he asks where he came from. She makes up all kinds of fantastic stories about her son’s past. From hot air balloons, to angels, to dragons, each story has a tiny hint of truth, letting the reader piece together their family’s adoption experience.

Just Right Family

Just Right Family by Sylvia Lopez, Illustrated by Ziyue Chen

This is a sweet story about Meili, an adopted child whose family is adopting a baby from Haiti. Meili isn’t thrilled about the idea of messing up their “just right family”, but she warms to the idea and realizes her family is still just right, even with a sister. I love that we are seeing the adoption process through the eyes of an older sibling in this book. Definitely a great read for families adopting a second child.

When The Babies Came To Stay

When The Babies Came to Stay By Christine McDonnell, Illustrated by Jeanette Bradley

In this book, we meet four babies who arrive on an island on the same day. They are taken in by the town’s librarian,, and they become the sweetest little family. While the word “adoption” is never used, I feel like this is a great read for children who have unanswered questions about their past.

I hope you all enjoy these books as much as I did!.What are your favorite books about adoption to read to your little ones? Be sure to comment below!

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5 Picture Books for World Kindness Day

I think we can all agree that the world could always use a little more kindness. In 1998, World Kindness Day was established as part of the World Kindness Movement. This is an international holiday dedicated to spreading kindness. We all know there are TONS of children’s books on the subject, but I thought I would take a moment today to share a few of my favorites. Please note: This article contains affiliate links. I receive a small commission from purchases made using these links. This commission allows me to maintain this website and continue posting reviews.

A Hat for Mrs. Goldman: A Story about Knitting and Love by Michelle Edwards, Illustrated by G. Brian Karas

Those of you who know me well know that when I’m not hoarding books, I’m hoarding yarn. This sweet picture book brings those two loves together for me. (Though technically, I crochet, because I’m not a skilled knitter at all.) In this book, we follow Sophia and her neighbor, Mrs. Goldman, who teaches her about mitzvahs when she is knitting hats for others. Sophia takes the lesson to heart and decides to make a hat for Mrs. Goldman. The illustrations are as warm as the story. Altogether, a cute read reminding us how rewarding it is to be generous.

Thank You Omu by Oge Mora

Thank You Omu was a fast favorite for me. The illustrations drew me in and the story got me, hook, line, and sinker. In this book we meet Omu, an older lady who is cooking a big pot of red stew. Her stew smells so good that everyone in the neighborhood comes by to ask her for a bowl. Omu is kind and gives them all stew until she has none left for her own dinner. Of course, that’s not where our story ends, but I don’t want to give it away. This one is a great story about gratitude and the rewards we reap when we are kind and generous.

I Walk with Vanessa: A Story About a Simple Act of Kindness by Kerascoët

I Walk With Vanessa is a wordless picture book. My favorite thing about this book is that children are able to narrate the story themselves. This format is perfect for those little readers just learning to read, because it encourages reading without the pressure of all those tricky words. In this book, the illustrations show Vanessa, a young girl who is moving to a new neighborhood. We see a boy who isn’t nice to Vanessa. Another girl notices this interaction and decides to do something about it. This is a sweet book about standing up for others and the power of kindness in communities.

Kindness Makes Us Strong is the perfect board book for introducing little ones to the concept of kindness. Sophie Beer is one of my favorite illustrators because her work is always absolutely adorable AND incredibly inclusive. In this book, there are children with lots of different skin tones and abilities, all providing examples of what it means to be kind. A favorite in our family, I recommend this one to anyone looking for board books.

Those Shoes by Maribeth Boelts Illustrated by Noah Z. Jones

This picture book handles many themes, including teasing, embarrassment, poverty, and (of course) kindness. This may seem like a lot for one picture book, but Boelts manages to blend these themes seamlessly. In this story, we meet Jeremy, a boy who wants the shoes everyone else is wearing, but his family cannot afford them. He is so determined that he finds a pair at a thrift store and buys them even though they don’t fit. This gives Jeremy the opportunity to do something nice for someone less fortunate than him.

I hope you all enjoyed my top five picks for World Kindess Day this year. Have you read any of them? What are some of your favorite books about kindness to read to your little ones? Leave a comment and let me know!

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