New Release Round Up: June 21, 2022

It’s Tuesday, so we are talking new releases again! What today’s round up lacks in quantity it makes up for in quality. We have some wonderful titles debuting today!

As always, these titles will have inclusive characters (think racial and cultural diversity, LGBTQ+ representation, diverse family structures, disability representation, and more), and fall into a range of genres in both fiction and nonfiction categories.

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Picture Books

Ally Baby Can: Be Feminist by Nyasha Williams, Illustrated by Jade Orlando

Ally Baby Can books introduce allyship to tiny change-makers! Perfect for shared reading with an adult.

Ally Baby Can: Be Feminist models how young kids can stand up for women and nonbinary people in the fight against sexism and gender inequality.

Extensive back matter includes important guidelines for allyship, a kid-friendly reading list, and other helpful resources for baby and you.

It is never too early to learn about ways to change our world.

BE SURE TO LOOK OUT FOR ALLY BABY CAN: BE ANTIRACIST!

The Big Book of Pride Flags by Jessica Kingsley, Illustrated by Jem Milton

“Celebrate and learn about the LGBTQIA+ community with this colourful book of Pride flags!

Featuring all the colours of the rainbow, this book teaches children about LGBTQIA+ identities through 17 different Pride flags. With fun facts, simple explanations and a short history of each flag accompanying beautiful illustrations, children will uncover the history of Pride and be introduced to different genders and sexual orientations. There’s also a blank Pride flag design at the back of the book so that children can create their very own Pride flag!

With a Reading Guide that provides a detailed History of the Pride Flag and questions for further discussion, this inspiring book is a must-have for every child’s bookshelf, library or classroom.”

Ice Cream Face by Heidi Woodward Sheffield

The Ezra Jack Keats Award–winning creator of Brick by Brick brings to delicious life the anxiety and elation involved in waiting in line to get ice cream.

As far as this ice-cream-loving kid is concerned, every meal should include ice cream. In any form, in every flavor, he loves it all. But what he doesn’t love is seeing other people with ice cream .  .  .  while he’s still waiting in line for his. That’s when he can get his mad, “no-ice-cream-yet, waiting-in-a-long-line face”–until he finally gets his cone, and his mad face melts into something sweet. Heidi Woodward Sheffield gently explores a range of emotions as they relate to this delicious, everyday experience.”

Twelve Days of Kindness by Irene Latham, Illustrated by Junghwa Park

Inspired by “The Twelve Days of Christmas,” this picture book illustrates the many different forms that kindness can take, from veteran picture book author Irene Latham.

On the first day of kindness,
I will give to you a hug that’s warm and true.

There are many ways to be kind. Follow one girl as she expresses gratitude through kind deeds all her own—a smile or encouraging word or even shared snacks—and discovers one act of kindness inspires another. In this heartwarming lyrical text, twelve acts of everyday kindness are set to the tune of “The Twelve Days of Christmas.” Along with vibrant and warm illustrations, this joyous read-aloud celebrates how small acts of kindness can be practiced at any age.”

American Desi by Jyoti Rajan Gopal, Illustrated by Supriya Kelkar

“A young girl longs to know where she fits in: Is she American? Or is she Indian? Does she have to pick or can she be both? With bright, joyful rhyme, and paired with an immersive art style using American and Indian fabrics, American Desi celebrates the experiences of young children growing up first and second generation Indian American: straddling the two cultural worlds they belong to, embracing all they love of both worlds and refusing to be limited by either.

This story is a powerful tribute to the joy of being South Asian and for every reader who aspires to bridge their worlds with grace, grit, and confidence.”

The Pet Potato by Josh Lacey, Illustrated by Momoko Abe

“Potatoes can’t do anything a pet should. They can’t learn tricks, or go for walks, or snuggle up with Albert.

But to Albert’s surprise, his potato begins to grow on him, and soon he can’t imagine having any other pet.

When the potato begins to rot, Albert is devastated. He buries it in his garden, and with a lot of care and a bit of patience, he discovers that his potato can do a great trick after all . . .

Josh Lacey and Momoko Abe have created a delightful, offbeat picture book about finding companionship in unlikely places.”

Tomatoes in My Lunchbox by Costantia Manoli, Illustrated by Magdalena Mora

“A child, newly arrived in another country, feels displaced, lonely, and a little scared on her first day of school. Her name doesn’t sound the way she’s used to hearing it. She knows she doesn’t fit in. And when she eats her whole tomato for lunch, she can feel her classmates observing her―and not quite understanding her.

But sometimes all it takes is one friend, one connection, to bring two worlds together, and gradually the girl, her tomato, and her full name, start to feel at home with her new friends and community.

This emotionally sweeping debut picture book by Costantia Manoli, with vibrant art by Magdalena Mora, artfully captures feelings of displacement and the joy that comes from forging new friendships.”

Middle Grade

Hana Hsu and the Ghost Crab Nation by Sylvia Liu

“Hana Hsu can’t wait to be meshed.

If she can beat out half her classmates at Start-Up, a tech school for the city’s most talented twelve-year-olds, she’ll be meshed to the multiweb through a neural implant like her mom and sister. But the competition is fierce, and when her passion for tinkering with bots gets her mixed up with dangerous junkyard rebels, she knows her future in the program is at risk.

Even scarier, she starts to notice that something’s not right at Start-Up—some of her friends are getting sick, and no matter what she does, her tech never seems to work right. With an ominous warning from her grandmother about being meshed, Hana begins to wonder if getting the implant early is really a good idea.”

That’s all I have for today. I hope you all enjoyed reading about these new releases, and hopefully you found one or two to add to your young reader’s shelves!

Which titles have you been looking forward to the most? Be sure to share in the comments below!

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