New Release Round Up: March 1, 2022

It’s Tuesday again, and March always means LOTS of new releases so I will get straight to it today.

As always, these titles will have inclusive characters (think racial and cultural diversity, LGBTQ+ representation, diverse family structures, disability representation, and more), and fall into a range of genres in both fiction and nonfiction categories.

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Board Books

Grandma and Me by Carole Boston Weatherford, Illustrated by Ashleigh Corrin

A celebration of family love from award-winning children’s author Carole Boston Weatherford, this beautiful rhyming board book is filled with all the sweet reasons why Grandma’s love is so special!

With simple rhyming text, a young child reflects on the many reasons they love their Grandma. From the games they play together to the way she understands her grandchild, this sweet story show us all just how much our grandmas love us! This is adorable board book is the perfect way for children to feel the love and security grandmas give and to celebrate the diverse ways that love is shown and celebrated!”

Cat’s First Baby by Natalie Nelson

“Cat is curious. There’s a new addition to the family, but who exactly is this small being? This new arrival doesn’t meow like a cat, or smell like a cat, or even have a tail like a cat. As Cat investigates, he might just come to appreciate this loud, silly family member. After all, they both enjoy a good catnap.  
 
In Cat’s First Baby, the feline companion to Dog’s First Baby, Natalie Nelson captures the wonder and humor of a new family member through a cat’s eyes. Sure to delight kids and cat parents alike, this board book promises to be a repeat read-aloud.”

How To Dress A Dinosaur by Robin Currie, Illustrated by Alycia Pace

“Every parent knows the struggle of getting a child dressed and out the door. But with a cast of hilariously coiffed dinosaurs to teach toddlers how to stomp their feet into pant legs and reach their claws into shirts, getting dressed becomes a game. With this playful companion to How to Potty Train a Dinosaur, your little dino lover will beg to join in the fun and get dressed like a dinosaur!”

Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns: A Muslim Book of Colors (A Muslim Book Of Concepts) by Hena Khan, Illustrated by Mehrdokht Amini

Now in board book, this picture book magnificently captures the colors of Islam and will inspire curiosity and conversations about world religions and cultures.

With breathtaking illustrations and informative text, Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns magnificently captures the world of Islam, celebrating its beauty and traditions for even the youngest readers. From a red prayer rug to a blue hijab, readers will learn about a different color of the Muslim world on each spread with a young Muslim girl and her family as a guide. Sure to inspire questions and observations about world religions and cultures, it is equally at home in a classroom reading circle as it is being read to a child on a parent’s lap.”

Picture Books

See You Soon by Mariame Kaba, Illustrated by Bianca Diaz



“Queenie loves living with Mama and Grandma Louise. Together, they go to the grocery store, eat ice cream, and play games in the park. Mama braids Queenie’s hair and helps her with her homework.

Sometimes, when Mama is sick, she has to go away. One day, Queenie and Grandma ride the bus with Mama to the county jail.

Queenie is worried about what will happen when Mama goes to jail. She’s afraid to ask questions, and overcome with feelings of worry and sadness. Does Mama have a warm bed to sleep in? When will Queenie see her again?

Soon after she and Grandma return home, Queenie opens a letter from Mama, and savors every word. She knows her Mama loves her, and looks forward to their upcoming visit.” 

Miguel’s Community Garden (Where in the Garden? #2) by JaNay Brown-Wood, Illustrated by Samara Hardy

“Miguel is throwing a party at his community garden for all of his friends, and he needs help searching for sunflowers to complete the celebration. What do we know about sunflowers? They’re tall with petals and leaves―and, hold on, is that a sunflower? No, that’s an artichoke. Where, oh, where could those sunflowers be? Can you help Miguel find them in time for his party?

The second title in JaNay Brown-Wood and Samara Hardy’s Where in the Garden? series stars an adorable young Latino exploring his garden while comparing, contrasting, and hunting for sunflowers among a multitude of warm-weather fruits and vegetables like apricots, artichokes, asparagus, mushrooms, spinach, and more.

Toddlers and preschoolers will delight as they discover the wonders of fresh produce, and after Miguel finally finds the patch of tall, yellow blossoms, a festive celebration ensues at the community garden where a diverse group of friends and Miguel’s two fathers feast on all of the fresh fruits and vegetables.”

The Supreme Court and Us by Christy Mihaly, Illustrated by Neely Daggett

Two kids learn about the Supreme Court with the help of key figures from US history.

Ada and Bea are on a tour of Washington, DC, learning all about the US Supreme Court, from its founding in 1789 to today. Along the way, they hear from the Constitution, important justices, and key figures from landmark cases, such as Plessy v. Ferguson and Brown v. Board of Education, gaining an understanding of how the court has shaped our lives.”

The Leaping Laddoo by by Harshita Jerath, Illustrated by Kamala M. Nair

Join a frolicking chase on the bustling streets of contemporary India.

Bhago, Bhago as fast as you can! Follow the leaping laddoo (luh-DOO), an Indian dessert, as it flees from the hands of its maker and eludes children, a tea seller, a groom on an elephant, and more. Can anyone end this crazy chase?

Featuring vibrant illustrations and sprinkled with Hindi words, this fun read-aloud also includes a laddoo recipe.”

She Persisted in Science by Chelsea Clinton, Illustrated by Alexandra Boiger

A STEM-focused addition to the #1 New York Times bestselling She Persisted series!

Throughout history, women have been told that science isn’t for them. They’ve been told that they’re not smart enough, or that their brains just aren’t able to handle it. In this book, Chelsea Clinton introduces readers to women scientists who didn’t listen to those who told them “no” and who used their smarts, their skills and their persistence to discover, invent, create and explain.

She Persisted in Science is for everyone who’s ever had questions about the world around them or the way things work, and who won’t give up until they find their answers.

With engaging artwork by Alexandra Boiger accompanying the inspiring text, this is a book that shows readers that everyone has the potential to make a difference, and that women in science change our world.”

Loujain Dreams of Sunflowers by Uma Mishra-Newbery and Lina AlHathloul, Illustrated by Rebecca Green

“Loujain watches her beloved baba attach his feather wings and fly each morning, but her own dreams of flying face a big obstacle: only boys, not girls, are allowed to fly in her country. Yet despite the taunts of her classmates, she is determined to do it—especially because Loujain loves colors, and only by flying can she see the color-filled field of sunflowers her baba has told her about. Eventually, he agrees to teach her, and Loujain’s impossible dream becomes reality—and soon other girls dare to learn to fly.

Based on the experiences of co-author Lina AlHathloul’s sister, Nobel Peace Prize nominee Loujain AlHathloul, who led the successful campaign to lift Saudi Arabia’s ban on women driving, this moving and gorgeously illustrated story reminds us to strive for the changes we want to see—and to never take for granted women’s and girls’ freedoms.”

I Want My Book Back by Viviane Elbee, Illustrated by Nicole Miles

“Daryl loves to play with his favorite library book about dinosaurs. His imagination takes him to prehistoric places, and he pretends to be a triceratopsmicroraptor, and even a T. rex! But Daryl does not want to share his book, so when he has to return it to the library, Daryl goes wild. Using all of his dinosaur skills, Daryl tries his best to get his book back! But when a clever librarian notices Daryl’s passion, she encourages him to share his favorite book and make some new friends along the way. This playful, silly, funny, tale about reading, books, and sharing is sure to be a hit with any child.”

All Moms by Sarah Kate Ellis and Kristen Ellis-Henderson, Illustrated by Max Rambaldi

All Moms is a love letter to mommies. Moms make us laugh. Moms read us stories. Moms snuggle us when we’re sad, and help us grow. Some moms are silly, some are sporty or crafty, but all moms are incredible. Moms can do anything!

Created in partnership with GLAAD, this inclusive picture book features and celebrates all different types of mommies and the amazing things they do.”

One Million Trees: A True Story by Kristen Balouch

The real-life story of a family who planted 1,000,000 trees– yes, it’s true!—to fight deforestation in British Columbia.

When Kristen Balouch was 10 years old, her parents made a surprising announcement: their whole family was going on a trip to plant trees!  Kristen, her sisters, and her mom and dad—and their pet, Wonder Dog!—flew from their California home to a logging site in British Columbia.  There, they joined a crew working to replant the trees that had been cut down.

In One Million Trees, Kristen reflects on the forty days they spent living in a tent, covered in mud and bug bites, working hard every day to plant a new forest.  Young readers will learn a little French, practice some math skills, and learn all about how to plant a tree the right way!

The kid-friendly, engaging text is paired with bold illustrations, full of fun details and bright colors. The story ends with a modern-day look at what Kristen’s family helped accomplish: a stand of huge trees growing on what used to be an empty, muddy patch of bare stumps.”

Sanctuary: Kip Tiernan and Rosie’s Place, the Nation’s First Shelter for Women by Christine McDonnell, Illustrated by Victoria Tentler-Krylov

“When Kip Tiernan was growing up during the Great Depression, she’d help her granny feed the men who came to their door asking for help. As Kip grew older, and as she continued to serve food to hungry people, she noticed something peculiar: huddled at the back of serving lines were women dressed as men. At the time, it was believed that there were no women experiencing homelessness. And yet Kip would see women sleeping on park benches and searching for food in trash cans. Kip decided to open the first shelter for women—a shelter with no questions asked, no required chores, just good meals and warm beds. With persistence, Kip took on the city of Boston in her quest to open Rosie’s Place, our nation’s first shelter for women.

Christine McDonnell, a former educator at Rosie’s Place, and illustrator Victoria Tentler-Krylov bring warmth to Kip Tiernan’s story of humanity and tenacity, showing readers how one person’s dream can make a huge difference, and small acts of kindness can lead to great things.”

One Sun and Countless Stars: A Muslim Book of Numbers (A Muslim Book Of Concepts) by Hena Khan, Illustrated by Mehrdokht Amini

Counting and culture come together in this stunning companion to Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns.

From one sun to countless stars, this gentle introduction to numbers also celebrates the many diverse traditions of the Muslim world, encouraging readers young and old to reflect upon—and count—their many blessings. Like Golden Domes and Silver Lanterns and Crescent Moons and Pointed Minarets, this latest offering in the Concepts of the Muslim World series has stunning illustrations, rhyming read-aloud text, and informative back matter, and it is equally at home in the classroom or being read on a parent’s lap.”

Middle Grade

New From Here by Kelly Yang

“When the coronavirus hits Hong Kong, ten-year-old Knox Wei-Evans’s mom makes the last-minute decision to move him and his siblings back to California, where they think they will be safe. Suddenly, Knox has two days to prepare for an international move—and for leaving his dad, who has to stay for work.

At his new school in California, Knox struggles with being the new kid. His classmates think that because he’s from Asia, he must have brought over the virus. At home, Mom just got fired and is panicking over the loss of health insurance, and Dad doesn’t even know when he’ll see them again, since the flights have been cancelled. And everyone struggles with Knox’s blurting-things-out problem.

As racism skyrockets during COVID-19, Knox tries to stand up to hate, while finding his place in his new country. Can you belong if you’re feared; can you protect if you’re new? And how do you keep a family together when you’re oceans apart? Sometimes when the world is spinning out of control, the best way to get through it is to embrace our own lovable”

Girls Solve Everything: Stories of Women Entrepreneurs Building a Better World by Catherine Thimmesh, Illustrated by Melissa Sweet

“Women all over the globe are asking questions that affect lives and creating businesses that answer them. Like, can we keep premature babies warm when they’re born far from the hospital? Or, can the elderly stay in their homes and eat a balanced diet?  Women are taking on and solving these issues with their ingenuity and business acumen.

How did they get their ideas? Where does the funding for their projects come from? And how have some of these businesses touched YOUR life? Girls Solve Everything answers these questions, inspiring today’s kids to learn from entrepreneurs and take on some of the world’s biggest problems, one solution at a time.”

Pilar Ramirez and the Escape from Zafa (Pilar Ramirez Duology #1) by Julian Randall

“Twelve-year-old Pilar Violeta “Purp” Ramirez’s world is changing, and she doesn’t care for it one bit. Her Chicago neighborhood is gentrifying and her chores have doubled since her sister, Lorena, left for college. The only constant is Abuela and Mami’s code of silence around her cousin Natasha―who vanished in the Dominican Republic fifty years ago during the Trujillo dictatorship.

When Pilar hears that Lorena’s professor studies such disappearances, she hops on the next train to dig deeper into her family’s mystery. After snooping around the professor’s empty office, she discovers a folder with her cousin’s name on it . . . and gets sucked into the blank page within.

She lands on Zafa, an island swarming with coconut-shaped demons, butterfly shapeshifters, and a sinister magical prison where her cousin is being held captive. Pilar will have to go toe-to-toe with the fearsome Dominican boogeyman, El Cuco, if she has any hope of freeing Natasha and getting back home.”

Graphic Novels

Wingbearer by Marjorie Liu, Illustrated by Tenny Issakhanian

A young girl must stop a threat to her magical world in this epic graphic novel from New York Times bestselling author Marjorie Liu and remarkable debut illustrator Teny Issakhanian.

Zuli is extraordinary—she just doesn’t realize it yet. Raised by mystical bird spirits in the branches of the Great Tree, she’s never ventured beyond this safe haven. She’s never had to. Until now.

When a sinister force threatens the life-giving magic of the tree, Zuli, along with her guardian owl, Frowly, must get to the root of it. So begins an adventure bigger than anything Zuli could’ve ever imagined—one that will bring her, along with some newfound friends, face-to-face with an ancient dragon, the so-called Witch-Queen, and most surprisingly of all: her true identity.

This captivating middle grade graphic novel, the first of a series, is perfect for fans of the Amulet books and the Wings of Fire series.”

That’s all I have for today. I hope you all enjoyed reading about these new releases, and hopefully you found one or two to add to your young reader’s shelves!

Which titles have you been looking forward to the most? Be sure to share in the comments below!

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