New Release Round Up – March 9, 2021

Happy Tuesday, everybody! It’s a crazy Tuesday in our home this week, but I’m not going to miss talking about new releases. We’ve got a fantastic line-up today.

As usual, these titles will have inclusive characters (such as racial and cultural diversity, LGBTQ+ representation, diverse family structures, disability representation, and more), and fall into a range of genres in both fiction and nonfiction categories.

Please Note: This post contains affiliate links. Affiliate links allow me to receive a small commission from purchases made, with no additional cost to you. This commission is used to maintain this site and continue bringing content to you.

Board Books

B Is For Baby by Atinuke, Illustreated by Angela Brooksbank (Bookshop | Amazon)

“B is for Baby. B is for Brother. B is for going to see Baba!

One morning after breakfast, Baby’s big brother is getting ready to take the basket of bananas all the way to Baba’s bungalow in the next village. He’ll have to go along the bumpy road, past the baobab trees, birds, and butterflies, and all the way over the bridge. But what he doesn’t realize is that his very cute, very curious baby sibling has stowed away on his bicycle! Little ones learning about language will love sounding out the words in this playful, vibrantly illustrated story set in West Africa.”

Picture Books

I’ll Meet You In Your Dreams by Jessica Young, Illustrated by Rafael Lopez (Bookshop | Amazon)

“A heartwarming text honoring the ever-evolving relationship of a parent and child across time, with visually striking art by bestselling and award-winning artist Rafael López.

Each evening when the sun has set, as nighttime casts a starry net, I’ll hitch a ride on moonbeams, and meet you in your dreams.

This poetic and tender story celebrates the parent-and-child bond in its many forms and offers gentle assurance of love across a lifetime. Two parents’ dreams of the future with their children—from early dependence for nourishment and basic needs, to the parent as home base for a child in later life—mirror an always-changing but unbreakable relationship.

Written in lyrical rhyme and accompanied by breathtaking art by the incomparable Rafael López, I’ll Meet You in Your Dreams affirms that parental love is a constant force, transcending boundaries of space and time.”

Send a Girl! The True Story of How Women Joined the FDNY by Jessica Rinker, Illustrated by Meg Hunt (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Brenda Berkman was often told that she couldn’t do certain things because she was a girl. When she grew up, she longed for a job that was challenging, different every day, and required physical and mental strength. In 1977 when the New York City Fire Department finally complied with the Civil Rights Act (from 1964) by allowing women to take the FDNY exam, Brenda jumped at the chance.

But the FDNY changed the rules of the exam so women wouldn’t be able to pass it. Even a lot of men couldn’t pass this new exam.

So Brenda Berkman took the FDNY to court. In 1982, they finally made a fair test, and Brenda and 40 other women passed. She then founded the United Women Firefighters, an organization that helps train and prepare women to be firefighters. Brenda went on to serve in the FDNY for 25 years, reaching the positions of Lieutenant and Captain, and was a first responder during the attacks on the Twin Towers on 9/11. Send a Girl! is Brenda Berkman’s inspiring story.”

You can also read my full review of Send a Girl for more information.

Kiyoshi’s Walk by Mark Karlins, Illustrated by Nicole Wong (Bookshop | Amazon)

“After Kiyoshi watches his grandfather, Eto, compose his delicate haiku, he wonders out loud: “Where do poems come from?” His grandfather answers by taking him on a walk through their city, where they see a cat perched on a hill of oranges; hear the fluttering of wings; imagine what’s behind a tall wall; and discuss their walk, with each incident inspiring a wonderful new haiku from Eto. As Kiyoshi discovers that poems come from the way the world outside of us meets the world within each of us, he also finds the courage to write a haiku of his own.

This lovely book will speak to any reader who treasures poetry, city life, grandparents, or the beauty of the everyday.”

Your Life Matters by Chris Singleton, Illustrated by Taylor Barron (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Empowering and validating, Your Life Matters reassures Black children everywhere that no matter what they hear, no matter what they experience, no matter what they’re told, their lives matter. Written by national speaker Chris Singleton, who lost his own mother in the 2015 Charleston church shooting, Your Life Matters teaches kids to stand tall in the face of racial adversity and fight for the life they dream of. Each page depicts a famous hero from Black history mentoring a child of today and encouraging them to use their mind, heart, voice, and hands in that fight. Hero-mentors in the book include: Maya Angelou, Jackie Robinson, Martin Luther King, Jr., Aretha Franklin, Katherine Johnson, Harriet Tubman, Frederick Douglas, Mary McLeod Bethune, George Washington Carver, and others.”

Be sure to read my full review of Your Life Matters for more detail.

Secrets of the Sea: The Story of Jeanne Power, Revolutionary Marine Scientist by Evan Griffith, Illustrated by Joanie Stone (Bookshop | Amazon)

“The curiosity, drive, and perseverance of the nineteenth-century woman scientist who pioneered the use of aquariums to study ocean life are celebrated in this gorgeous, empowering picture book.

How did a nineteenth-century dressmaker revolutionize science? Jeanne Power was creative: she wanted to learn about the creatures that swim beneath the ocean waves, so she built glass tanks and changed the way we study underwater life forever. Jeanne Power was groundbreaking: she solved mysteries of sea animals and published her findings at a time when few of women’s contributions to science were acknowledged. Jeanne Power was persistent: when records of her research were lost, she set to work repeating her studies. And when men tried to take credit for her achievements, she stood firm and insisted on the recognition due to her.

Jeanne Power was inspiring, and the legacy of this pioneering marine scientist lives on in every aquarium.”

Can I Sit With You by Sarah Jacoby (Bookshop | Amazon)

“The story of a girl and a dog who discover how life transforms and expands with someone by your side.

With lyrical text and stunning illustrations, this empathy read illustrates the power of friendship in the face of change.Can I Sit with You? takes readers along one loyal dog’s journey with the girl he’s meant to be with, no matter how far she roams. This timeless picture book illustrates the importance of companionship and loyalty, and how engaging with others makes the world embrace you in return.”

Middle Grade

Treaty Words: For As Long As the Rivers Flow by Aimée Craft, Illustrated by Luke Swinson (Bookshop | Amazon)

“The first treaty that was made was between the earth and the sky. It was an agreement to work together. We build all of our treaties on that original treaty.

On the banks of the river that have been Mishomis’s home his whole life, he teaches his granddaughter to listen—to hear both the sounds and the silences, and so to learn her place in Creation. Most importantly, he teaches her about treaties—the bonds of reciprocity and renewal that endure for as long as the sun shines, the grass grows, and the rivers flow.

Accompanied by beautiful illustrations by Luke Swinson and an author’s note at the end, Aimée Craft affirms the importance of understanding an Indigenous perspective on treaties in this evocative book that is essential for readers of all ages.”

Starfish by Lisa Fipps (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Ever since Ellie wore a whale swimsuit and made a big splash at her fifth birthday party, she’s been bullied about her weight. To cope, she tries to live by the Fat Girl Rules–like “no making waves,” “avoid eating in public,” and “don’t move so fast that your body jiggles.” And she’s found her safe space–her swimming pool–where she feels weightless in a fat-obsessed world. In the water, she can stretch herself out like a starfish and take up all the room she wants. It’s also where she can get away from her pushy mom, who thinks criticizing Ellie’s weight will motivate her to diet. Fortunately, Ellie has allies in her dad, her therapist, and her new neighbor, Catalina, who loves Ellie for who she is. With this support buoying her, Ellie might finally be able to cast aside the Fat Girl Rules and starfish in real life–by unapologetically being her own fabulous self.”

Amina’s Song by Hena Kahn (Bookshop | Amazon)

“It’s the last few days of her vacation in Pakistan, and Amina has loved every minute of it. The food, the shops, the time she’s spent with her family—all of it holds a special place in Amina’s heart. Now that the school year is starting again, she’s sad to leave, but also excited to share the wonders of Pakistan with her friends back in Greendale.

After she’s home, though, her friends don’t seem overly interested in her trip. And when she decides to do a presentation on Pakistani hero Malala Yousafzai, her classmates focus on the worst parts of the story. How can Amina share the beauty of Pakistan when no one wants to listen? “

Graphic Novels

Seen: Rachel Carson by Birdie Willis, Illustrated by Rii Abrego (Bookshop | Amazon)

“Meet Rachel Carson, the woman who changed the way America fought against the environmental crisis through her bestselling books, ultimately spurring the creation of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Birdie Willis & Rii Abrego present the true story of the marine biologist whose dedication, compassion and integrity gave a new generation of Americans hope for a brighter tomorrow.

It’s about being seen. Both for who you are, and who you hope you can become. History is a mirror, and all too often, the history we’re told in school reflects only a small subset of the population. In Seen: True Stories of Marginalized Trailblazers, you’ll find the stories of the real groundbreakers who changed our world for the better. They’re the heroes: the inventors, the artists, the activists, and more whose stories you won’t want to miss. The people whose lives show us both where we are, and where we’re going.”

I hope you all enjoyed reading about these new releases, and hopefully you found one or two to add to your young reader’s shelves!

Did I miss any releases you’re excited for? Be sure to share in the comments below!

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